6.RP.A.2

6.RP.2. Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio a:b with b ≠ 0, and use rate language in the context of a ratio relationship. For example, “This recipe has a ratio of 3 cups of flour to 4 cups of sugar, so there is 3/4 cup of flour for each cup of sugar.” “We paid $75 for 15 hamburgers, which is a rate of $5 per hamburger.”

There are 7 videos in this category and 0 videos in 0 subcategories.

Category Videos
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 11 - 16
2729 Views:
Introduction to Ratios - Khan Academy
From YouTube, produced by Salman Khan
Basic ratio problems. This video starts off with a black screen because the narrator uses it as a 'chalkboard'. This video is appropriate for older middle and high school students. (07:28)
August 22, 2009 at 08:19 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 10 - 16
1773 Views:
Qtr 1, Lesson 10: Ratios and Rates
From YouTube, produced by Stan Lisle
This is a video lesson explaining ratios, rates and unit rates, with problems to test what you've learned.  The video contains several example problems that are worked through.  This would be good to use at an independent computer station during math... [more]
November 6, 2012 at 07:27 AM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 10 - 16
6253 Views:
How to use Ratios and Proportions to Solve Real World Problems
From YouTube, produced by mrtedmartin
Instructor uses a Power Point presentation to demonstrate how to use ratios and proportions to solve problems real world problems.  Unit rates are discussed and definitions are given.  Solving unit rate problems are modeled and a calculator is used f... [more]
Found by RonnieBurt in 6.RP.A.2
April 14, 2010 at 11:46 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 11 - 16
1996 Views:
Finding Unit Ratios
From Curriki, produced by NextVista for Learning
Sometimes you need the number "1" in the denominator. Do you know why? Find out, and in the process, you'll be able to handle a set of word problems that may have been vexing you. This video by Duane Habecker is part of the video collection at NextVi... [more]
June 30, 2009 at 01:00 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 11 - 18
3123 Views:
How to Teach Ratio in Mathematics
From ehow.com, produced by eHow.com
This clip gives good tips to introducing ratios to students.  (01:43)
October 29, 2012 at 04:36 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 12 - 16
2277 Views:
Ratios
From YouTube, produced by Lawrence Perez
In this video they are showing ratios, how to write them as a fraction (reduce if possible), comparing ratios using LCD, comparing decimal ratios, and comparing fraction to decimal. A few examples are done to complete this video.  Video is good quali... [more]
Found by Barb in 6.RP.A.2
August 2, 2009 at 06:27 PM
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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 11 - 16
759 Views:
Math Snacks - Bad Date (Ratio of Words Spoken)
From mathsnacks.com, produced by NM State University Learning Games Lab
This is a humorous way to introduce ratios. What do you do when someone asks if you listen to country music backwards, but won't give you the chance to answer? In this humorous animation, who speaks how many words turns out to determine whether a dat... [more]
Found by wendyofoz in 6.RP.A.2
November 15, 2012 at 10:13 PM
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